Posted by: Pamela Kalivas | July 23, 2012

Are your eyes primed for the 2012 Summer Olympics?

As the U.S. hones their “eagle eyes” on taking home the most “gold” in the upcoming 2012 summer Olympics, it reminds us to take a moment to focus in on our vision as we watched the upcoming events whether from a TV or computer.  How many times have I caught clients hunched over staring into a bright computer screen? Too many to count!

Over 4 Billion people worldwide are expected to watch the Summer Olympics on television. Team USA has won more medals in the Summer Games than any other country with 2,302 medals. (NBCOLYMPICS.COM)

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, computers are used in the United States by 100 million people at their jobs daily. (Izquierdo, 2012).

Here are tips to keeping your “eyes on the prize” whether watching the Olympics or actually doing your work on the computer these next few weeks.

Computer Vision Syndrome can affect students, professionals, and anyone who fails to set themselves up for success.

The symptoms of Computer Vision Syndrome include:

Olympics

Olympics (Photo credit: Falcon Writing)

1. blurred vision

2. dry eyes

3. neck and shoulder pain

4. headaches

5. eyestrain

If you are experiencing these symptoms it may be caused by poor lighting, screen glare, poor posture, uncorrected vision, or sitting too far or close to the screen.  Imagine a pole vaulter who has high physical demands to vault over heights up to 15-20 feet.  Our eyes have to work harder to “leap” over the high visual demands of a bright computer screen. This is why individuals spending large amounts of time without proper positioning or lighting are susceptible to vision problems and headaches on the computer.

Here are five things to do:

1. Make sure your eyes are looking downward when viewing your computer screen.

2. Position the computer screen to avoid glare (particularly overhead lighting).

3. Rest your eyes every 15 minutes  after 2 hours of continuous computer use and look into the distance for 20 seconds to allow your eyes a chance to refocus.

4. Match the computer screen to the brightness of the environment.

Here are five things to do:

1. Make sure your eyes are looking downward when viewing your computer screen.

2. Position the computer screen to avoid glare (particularly overhead lighting).

3. Rest your eyes every 15 minutes  after 2 hours of continuous computer use and look into the distance for 20 seconds to allow your eyes a chance to refocus.

4. Match the computer screen to the brightness of the environment.

5. Keep pixel size as low as possible and flicker rate at high as possible.

Let the Games Begin. . . .Go Team USA!

~Pam

References:

Izquierdo, N.J. 2012. Computer Vision Syndrome. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com.

 

 

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